Thursday, June 30, 2016

All About the Thread

Thread is a recurring topic of conversation with bead weavers.  I normally test new threads and often return to my old standby choices.

I started beading using Nymo.  I learned about threading the needle from the cut end of the thread.  I learned to scratch my needle and thread along the glass of the beads not just poking thru the holes of the beads all willy nilly.  I learned to stretch the Nymo before using.  I learned to take out knots with two needles.  I learned to condition the thread.  I can still hear some of my teachers in the 1990's talking about using thread in ways not to split, fray, or get all tangled.

Then I learned about Fire Line.  At first, I hated it.  Change is not always easy.  I had learned on soft threads.  I had learned to use them and liked them.  But I switched to Fire Line as it seemed students liked it better and the store owner where I was teaching most of the time always recommended it.  It did react better for most students than Nymo.  Not as much knotting, little fraying or splitting, and generally easier to use.

When C-Lon and S-Lon came out, I tried both.  I liked both better than Nymo but by this time I was used to Fire Line so seldom used thread.  I tried others not specifically mentioned here but for years I have stuck with Fire Line.  I even purchased some of the dyed Fire Line from the Sparkle Spot to satisfy my need for color.

All during this thread journey, I've also used Power Pro for pieces with crystals in lots of angles.  I still do for some pieces.  It is one of the strongest and most resistant to cutting.  So it is often my go to thread when using a lot of crystals.  But it is more expensive than Fire Line so not my first choice of threads.  And I find it somewhat hard to thread the needle.

Then new Japanese threads came out on the market.  I tried Sono and found it much like the other improved threads, C-Lon etc.  The colors are soft and subdued.  I tried One G.  I liked it better and when I want a colored thread I have used this one up to this point.  There are better color choices of One G as well.

A cousin to Fire Line on the market used by many is Nanofil.  It is also a fishing line.  Much like Fire Line it is stronger than most threads and does not tend to fray, knot, or tangle as easily.  Nanofil also comes in a nice green which blends better than the Fire Line color choices.  It seems a bit slicker and softer in the drape of pieces which I liked because it is more like the old Nymo thread that I learned on.  So I do like this product a lot and use it as my first choice.

But, I still often want color.  So ok, I use One G for color.  The down side to One G for me is that it is very slick.  When the thread is shorter, I often pull the needle right off!  Not fun.  And I can't add thread the same way I do with either Fire Line or Nanofil.  I prefer to add using the knot, melt, and tug technique.  I almost always add that way now.

New on the market now is a Japanese thread called Hana.  So I figure, why not, I'll test it.  I received my order for Hana Monday, June 27, 2016.  I’ve tested it in three different projects and had students try it in classes twice.  So far my results are totally positive.    I like this Hana much better than other threads.  The colors are fantastic.  SO I figure I'll try the knot, melt, and tug technique to add thread the same as Fireline.  Hana worked!  That probably doesn’t mean much to some of you, but to any bead weaver who likes to add using the knot, melt, and tug technique it will.  I’ve added at least 8 times in the last couple of days and each worked.  Students told me that it was not getting tangled as much as Fireline.  I even like the spool better.  The little slot to hold the cut thread is a great bonus.

So for my 2 cents, this thread solves some of my issues I have had with other threads and brings great colors to my beady life.  My first 4 spools will not be my last.  Hana thread is available from The Beadsmith.




 

6 comments:

Allida Webb said...

Thank you, I'm looking for what's best for embroidery and teacher says c-lon AA. So I may they this out, compared to fireline I don't like c lon.

Allida Webb said...

Thank you, I'm looking for what's best for embroidery and teacher says c-lon AA. So I may they this out, compared to fireline I don't like c lon.

Marcia L. Balonis said...

Thread choice is such a personal thing. Many work in bead embroidery just fine. I always encourage students to use their favorite. If you get tangled or have issues with a thread, it isn't best for you. C-Lon isn't one of my favorites either. Sometimes recommendations are cost based. C-Lon is less expensive than most. Use what you like is my advice.

Happy Traveler said...

On your knot, melt, tug routine, will you describe how you melt? Thank you

Happy Traveler said...

On your knot, melt, tug routine, will you describe how you melt? Thank you

Marcia L. Balonis said...

I use the thread burner. People who are skilled with a lighter usually use that. I've never practiced enough to be able to master a lighter.